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Thread: A Navy Prick

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    A Navy Prick


  2. #2


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    I've had this for several years. It was a very lucky find. I was tempted to pull the cord and unwrap it at one point, but decided against it.

    It will remain as an untouched artifact.




    It weighs 77.5 grams.


    I was told by a British collector that R&J Hill were the main suppliers to the Royal Navy and that such a corded plug could have been a part of sailors rations.
    Last edited by dmcmtk; 08-18-2017 at 16:55. Reason: Too much sophmoric double entendre...

  3. #3


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    These navy plugs are also sometimes known as "perique", but I think that may be a corruption of "prick" perhaps?
    Transcription from the spoken to the written?
    I don't know,
    but here's a good blogpost on the general topic of old time Navy plugs:

    http://julianstockwin.com/2013/10/17...rique-or-plug/
    Last edited by misterlowercase; 08-18-2017 at 16:38.

  4. #4


    7 members Liked or found this post helpful.

    I tried to find examples of usage as applied to the term,
    and the earliest thing I found is an example of the word being used circa 1777,
    from The Chapters by Nauticus:

    Circa 1801 it showed up (simply as a term being defined) in
    The British Mariner's Vocabulary;
    or Universal Dictionary of Technical Terms and Sea Phrases Used in the Construction, Equipment, Management and Military Operations of a Ship
    by J.J. Moore.

    A guy named Galf defines it thusly:

    Prick –-- A pound-weight of tobacco, officially called a prick of tobacco, issued loose to seamen was formed, by the recipient, into a tightly rolled cylinder wrapped in canvas, after a soaking in rum whenever possible, with obvious anatomical similarities that have come ashore. Some claim the term ‘prick’ is a corruption of ‘perique’, a dark Virginian tobacco, but this did not occur until the late 19c, and the unspoilt term was in use in the 17c, so this spurious claim is just a sop to the delicate.

    http://www.abandos.com/?page_id=38

    So, the term must've been fairly common in the sailor lexicon.
    Last edited by dmcmtk; 08-18-2017 at 16:56. Reason: See above...

  5. #5
    Moderator Brooklin Bill's Avatar
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    5 members Liked or found this post helpful.

    The best teachers tell you where to look but not what to see.

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    PSU Member Simon G's Avatar
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    7 members Liked or found this post helpful.

    Whoa! Stop right there cowboy!!! LMFAO! Have a word will youse mods!

    Troy! You don't know what this means to us Brits? I'm shocked sir! & most amused! Thankyou for a needed belly laugh!
    Last edited by dmcmtk; 08-18-2017 at 16:58. Reason: See above...again.
    St. Bruno simply satisfies!

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    Moderator jimbo44's Avatar
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    Good call on the derivation!

    I bought one once (in 1961?) - it was bloody strong.
    Work is the curse of the smoking classes

  8. #8
    PSU Member Simon G's Avatar
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    Agh! Now the mods have deleted the quote, took the fun out of it & made me look a fool! I was only having a laugh boys.
    Troy, you know how much I like your posts & the effort you put in. This looks to be one your best, & when my eyes have dried up I look forward to reading it properly. But when I saw the opening lines I just cracked up laughing. Who from these shores wouldn't?
    St. Bruno simply satisfies!

  9. #9


    8 members Liked or found this post helpful.

    Quote Originally Posted by Brooklin Bill View Post
    That's a very interesting monograph and I had to get myself a copy,
    it includes instructions for making as well as a bit of the history...





    There's also a viddie on yootoob demonstrating how to make one...


  10. #10


    5 members Liked or found this post helpful.

    Quote Originally Posted by Simon G View Post
    Whoa! Stop right there cowboy!!! LMFAO! Have a word will youse mods!

    Troy! You don't know what this means to us Brits? I'm shocked sir! & most amused! Thankyou for a needed belly laugh!
    Cheers Simon!




    A bit of uncouth innuendo on my part.

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