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Thread: Maltreated Dunhill

  1. #21
    PSU Member Dunstan Hillwell's Avatar
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    Jesper Nielsen
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    1962
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    2 members Liked or found this post helpful.

    Thank you for your kind words, Thomas and Joe.
    I tried to repeat it with and old Peterson Churchwarden with a thoroughly chomped bit and a maltreated bowl, but...
    So it's off to see the Pipe Wizard together with a couple of its little friends.

    In tabaco veritas et fumo ergo sum
    (Masperius the Elder)

  2. #22
    PSU Member Fr_Tom's Avatar
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    Fr. Tom
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    5 members Liked or found this post helpful.

    My father was a guy who just did not care if the bowl got a little battered by smacking ashes out on a brick wall/whatever. When pipes broke or could not be smoked any more, you tossed them and got another Westbrook pipe with the 2-pack of Half and Half promo. He would not have understood Dunhill just in general.

    He had a cast iron ash tray in the shape of a fish, and I inherited it. I would smack ashes out on it (following my father's example), but in '79 or '80 I lost an Amphora coupon pipe and dropped by Garfinkel's in Washington DC to get a replacement. It was a panel billiard and a significantly nicer pipe than I had ever had. It probably cost $20, which was a whole new league for me in terms of price point. I resolved not to smack it out on anything hard (including the cast iron ash tray), because I did not want to round off all the outer top of the bowl.

    These days, it is a cork knocker in the office or in the den. If I am outside, it is the heel of my shoe. I still have a couple of the early pipes with the bashed tops, and they smoke well in that state.

    As an aside, I typically have an aversion to topped bowls. If I can tell they have been topped, I would usually rather have the bashed/burnt rim. I have a few estates that are great smokers, but look bad to my eye due to being topped. If they have been refinished and touched up by someone with an eye for these things I am good with that. This one looks very nice to me.
    Last edited by Fr_Tom; 01-07-2018 at 14:45.
    "Prov'dence don't fire no blank ca'tridges, boys" Roughing It, Mark Twain

  3. #23
    PSU Member Dunstan Hillwell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Denmark
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    Jesper Nielsen
    Pipe smoker since
    1962
    Posts
    901


    2 members Liked or found this post helpful.

    Quote Originally Posted by Fr_Tom View Post
    My father was a guy who just did not care if the bowl got a little battered by smacking ashes out on a brick wall/whatever. When pipes broke or could not be smoked any more, you tossed them and got another Westbrook pipe with the 2-pack of Half and Half promo. He would not have understood Dunhill just in general.

    He had a cast iron ash tray in the shape of a fish, and I inherited it. I would smack ashes out on it (following my father's example), but in '79 or '80 I lost an Amphora coupon pipe and dropped by Garfinkel's in Washington DC to get a replacement. It was a panel billiard and a significantly nicer pipe than I had ever had. It probably cost $20, which was a whole new league for me in terms of price point. I resolved not to smack it out on anything hard (including the cast iron ash tray), because I did not want to round off all the outer top of the bowl.

    These days, it is a cork knocker in the office or in the den. If I am outside, it is the heel of my shoe. I still have a couple of the early pipes with the bashed tops, and they smoke well in that state.

    As an aside, I typically have an aversion to topped bowls. If I can tell they have been topped, I would usually rather have the bashed/burnt rim. I have a few estates that are great smokers, but look bad to my eye due to being topped. If they have been refinished and touched up by someone with an eye for these things I am good with that. This one looks very nice to me.
    When I started out all those years ago, my father taught me some simple rules which I still follow. Always remove the ashes by tapping the pipe against the palm of your hand and/or use a pipe tool. Never bang it against anything hard. Use a pipe cleaner and put the pipe aside to cool off. Always smoke good tobaccos.

    I'm very careful when/if topping, especially because I'm new to this restoring. In the Dunhill case, I had no choice as I dislike severe burn marks immensely.
    Thaank you very much; it pleases me no end that you liked the result.

    In tabaco veritas et fumo ergo sum
    (Masperius the Elder)

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