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Thread: Pipe Tools Question

  1. #21
    PSU Member Cigar & Pipe Connoisseur's Avatar
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    I just updated my pipe cleaning and buffing tool list that does not require bench grinder:


    • BJ Long Regular Pipe Cleaners
    • BJ Long Bristle Pipe Cleaners
    • Cotton Swab
    • Kleen Reem Pipe Tool
    • PIPNET Pipe Reamer
    • Savinelli Fitsall Pipe Reamer
    • Isopropyl Alcohol
    • OxiClean
    • Mr. Clean Magic Eraser
    • Micro-Mesh 2" x 2" Soft Touch Pads
    • Jewelers Rouge Polishing Cloth
    • Paragon™ Wax for the Pipe
    • Halcyon II™ Wax for the Pipe
    • Microfiber Cloth


    By the way, I wonder what is the best camera bag for carrying pipes, tobaccos and tools.
    Last edited by Cigar & Pipe Connoisseur; 06-07-2018 at 10:00.

  2. #22
    PSU Owner dmcmtk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cigar & Pipe Connoisseur View Post
    I just updated my pipe cleaning and buffing tool list that does not require bench grinder:


    • BJ Long Regular Pipe Cleaners
    • BJ Long Bristle Pipe Cleaners
    • Cotton Swab
    • Kleen Reem Pipe Tool
    • PIPNET Pipe Reamer
    • Savinelli Fitsall Pipe Reamer
    • Isopropyl Alcohol
    • OxiClean
    • Mr. Clean Magic Eraser
    • Micro-Mesh 2" x 2" Soft Touch Pads
    • Jewelers Rouge Polishing Cloth
    • Paragon™ Wax for the Pipe
    • Halcyon II™ Wax for the Pipe
    • Microfiber Cloth
    You can get quite a lot done with the above. I would add some 400, 600, and 800 grit sandpaper. All of the estate pipes I've ever cleaned for my own use (a few hundred) have been done without the use of any power tools.

  3. #23
    PSU Member Cigar & Pipe Connoisseur's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmcmtk View Post
    You can get quite a lot done with the above. I would add some 400, 600, and 800 grit sandpaper. All of the estate pipes I've ever cleaned for my own use (a few hundred) have been done without the use of any power tools.
    Thanks! Are sandpapers are same as micro mesh (I found micro mesh seemed more preferable to me)? Good to see someone who cleans pipes without power tools!!
    Last edited by Cigar & Pipe Connoisseur; 06-07-2018 at 10:03.

  4. #24
    PSU Owner dmcmtk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cigar & Pipe Connoisseur View Post
    Thanks! Are sandpapers are same as micro mesh (I found micro mesh seemed more preferable to me)? Good to see someone who cleans pipes without power tools!!
    No not the same. Micromesh, say 3200-3600 and up are really more useful in doing the final polishing of stems and stumels. Bearing in mind that new micromesh is going to be more abrasive than older more worn micromesh. I don't know how many sets I've gone through. I've kept them all, as they can be washed and reused. For example, polishing a stummmel with used 3600>4000>6000>8000 micro will give you a very smooth, very shiny, finish before even applying any wax.

    The high grit papers, I typically use on stems (wet, usually starting with 600) before the final polishing with micromesh. Best advice with abrading, less is better. One can always do more, but you can't put material back!

  5. #25
    PSU Member Cigar & Pipe Connoisseur's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmcmtk View Post
    No not the same. Micromesh, say 3200-3600 and up are really more useful in doing the final polishing of stems and stumels. Bearing in mind that new micromesh is going to be more abrasive than older more worn micromesh. I don't know how many sets I've gone through. I've kept them all, as they can be washed and reused. For example, polishing a stummmel with used 3600>4000>6000>8000 micro will give you a very smooth, very shiny, finish before even applying any wax.

    The high grit papers, I typically use on stems (wet, usually starting with 600) before the final polishing with micromesh. Best advice with abrading, less is better. One can always do more, but you can't put material back!
    Thank you! So, how many grits of sandpapers and micromesh needed for polishing pipes???

  6. #26
    PSU Owner dmcmtk's Avatar
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    The other thing I'd say is tape. Some like just regular scotch tape, some electrical tape, some blue painter's tape. Used to tape of the stummel when working on the stem while it's on the pipe, to prevent rounding over the tenon end of the stem, and ensure a smooth fit between the stem and stummel. It's a very common mistake, this rounding over. One can see it on many ebay pipes for example.

  7. #27
    PSU Owner dmcmtk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cigar & Pipe Connoisseur View Post
    Thank you! So, how many grits of sandpapers and micromesh needed for polishing pipes???
    Well, polishing, is completely different than sanding to remove stain. Typically micromesh sets are 1500-12000. The best thing is to work on some inexpensive pipes to get a feel for how everything works.

    The other thing I would say, is spend time on the internals. Tobacco chamber, airway, mortise, and stem airway. A pipe can look pretty externally, but still taste, and smoke terribly from remnant tars that have accumulated.

  8. #28
    PSU Member Cigar & Pipe Connoisseur's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmcmtk View Post
    The other thing I'd say is tape. Some like just regular scotch tape, some electrical tape, some blue painter's tape. Used to tape of the stummel when working on the stem while it's on the pipe, to prevent rounding over the tenon end of the stem, and ensure a smooth fit between the stem and stummel. It's a very common mistake, this rounding over. One can see it on many ebay pipes for example.
    Appreciated! Tapes for holding??

  9. #29
    PSU Member Cigar & Pipe Connoisseur's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmcmtk View Post
    Well, polishing, is completely different than sanding to remove stain. Typically micromesh sets are 1500-12000. The best thing is to work on some inexpensive pipes to get a feel for how everything works.
    So, it is up to personal preference right??

  10. #30
    PSU Owner dmcmtk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cigar & Pipe Connoisseur View Post
    Appreciated! Tapes for holding??
    No to mask of the briar of the stummel so as not to abrade it, and damage the finish.

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